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The Pledge of Allegiance

I pledge allegiance...
You promise to be true

...to the flag...
to the emblem of your country

... of the United States of America...
a nation made up of fifty states and several territories, each with certain rights of its own

... and to the republic...
a country where the people elect representatives from among themselves to make laws for them

...for which it stands...
the flag represents the United States of America

... one nation under God,...
a country whose people are free to believe in God

... indivisible,...
the nation cannot be split into parts

... with liberty and justice...
with freedom and fairness

...for all. ...
for every person in the country - you and every other American.


It hasn't always been like that...

The Pledge of Allegiance was written in August 1892 by the socialist minister Francis Bellamy (1855-1931). It was originally published in The Youth's Companion on September 8, 1892. Bellamy had hoped that the pledge would be used by citizens in any country.

In its original form it read:

"I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1923, the words, "the Flag of the United States of America" were added. At this time it read:

"I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all."

In 1954, in response to the Communist threat of the times, President Eisenhower encouraged Congress to add the words "under God," creating the 31-word pledge we say today. Bellamy's daughter objected to this alteration.

Section 4 of the Flag Code states:

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag: "I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.", should be rendered by standing at attention facing the flag with the right hand over the heart. When not in uniform men should remove any non-religious headdress with their right hand and hold it at the left shoulder, the hand being over the heart. Persons in uniform should remain silent, face the flag, and render the military salute."


Outdoor Code